So What Happens At A Flight Attendant Interview?


If you have been called for a flight attendant interview then congratulations! It means that so far you’re resume and applicable cover letter has either got you past a telephone interview or into a group interview. (Feel free to check my sample flight attendant resumes).

NOTE:Group interviews can be as much a process as your one-on-one (or panel) interview.

Your flight attendant interview by-the-way is a target selection process which I’ll explain shortly but first you need to ‘survive’ your group interview.

Typically these are held in a hotel conference room or even at a horse racing club like one of my previous interviews. Don’t forget, your highest priority at your flight attendant job interview is to be immaculate in your presentation for your flight attendant job interview.

After registration you’ll await a call to be ushered into a seating area for the interview process to start. In practicality these interviews really are in all seriousness a broad cull session disguised as an information session.

Again, typically what happens is that you’ll be seated in a room with lines of chairs and tables. A company rep (interviewer) will stand up to welcome you and brief you about the company and position of flight attendant with their company.

You then get to watch a promo video about the company before being given the chance to ask questions and then you’re asked to partake in a group activity. This will be observed by one of the interviewers at your table which typically seats 6 to 8 flight attendant applicants.

Now ‘group activities’ and what they are all about and how to ‘play the game’ are discussed in step-2 of the AFAA 3-step system suffice to say if you don’t ‘play the game’, you won’t make it through to your flight attendant interview. And yes it’s as simple as that.

I apologise if I call it a game but I know what the interviewer is looking for and while some candidates will naturally fly through the process, others are perhaps not so endorsed or familiar with what is happening. It can be a cruel process because I have seen too many good people fail to get the job when really they would have made excellent flight attendants. This may be due to something as simple as the language you use, how you talk or pronounce your words or in effect how you communicate. You must realize that communication as a flight attendant is a factor of many things .

Here’s the problem though: The international interview that I attended in 2002 for an overseas airline had over 1800 people turn up for the interview. At the end of the day they had chosen 19 people. That means they culled out more than 1771 people in less than 16 hours of interviewing.

And here’s my point: Interviewers are people and under this time frame and with these enormous numbers they make mistakes. If you let them form a mistaken conclusion about you possibly by you not playing the game then you’re history.

However to continue... At the end of this session your name may be read out and you’ll be asked to wait outside. One of these groups will then be informed diplomatically that unfortunately they didn’t make the next round of interviews and the other group paradoxically will be informed that you are to proceed to the next stage.

Now depending on how big the group is you maybe yet again be organised into a group type interview and the process will be repeated with new activities until they have culled the mass to the numbers and candidates they want. Again these activities are discussed in further detail in step-2 of the AFAA 3-step system. The thing you need to understand at the outset is that you are being OBSERVED!

Eventually this game will stop and you will be asked to come back for a one-on-one (or panel) interview. Now this may or may not happen in the same day.

So, what is the “normal” one-on-one (panel) Flight Attendant Interview process now? Here’s a dot form of what you can expect to happen.

  1. You are greeted, and given the name and position of the interviewer. Hint: Remember it and use it.

  2. The purpose of the interview will be explained. (This will acquaint you with the interviewer and will define the organisation and position). Hint: Research the organisation and position prior.

  3. The interviewer will describe the interview and the interview process.

  4. They will indicate that they will be taking notes through-out the interview.

  5. You will be asked a few questions that will review your past jobs/experience.

  6. You will be asked to clarify your answers in detail.

  7. They may ask you if you have any questions.Hint: Always ask a few questions. (This shows interest and communication skills and gives you the opportunity to build a brief but telling rapport).


They will be using a Target Selection Process to assess you.

The SIX components of the Targeted Selection Flight Attendant Interview are:

  1. Use past behaviour to predict future behaviour.

  2. Identify the decisive requirements and flight attendant job description for the position. (Selection Rating)

  3. Organise selection elements into a comprehensive system. I.E.

    • Sourcing applicants

    • Screening

    • Interviewing

    • Simulations

    • Reference Checks

    • Medical Checks

  4. Use matrix for interviewing applicants (you) - This will involve asking questions that will require you to answer fully and succinctly. See my 7 Top Flight Attendant Interview Tips I’d like to share for more on the SAO method of answering these type of questions

  5. Discuss interview results (yours) with fellow colleagues

  6. Combine all verbal and non-verbal feedback observed of the applicant (you) for consistency of outcome

Each component is used to improve the accuracy and fairness for offer of employment decisions.


Advise applicant (You):

Again this may or may not happen on the same day. You may have to wait a day, a week or even several weeks before they say yes... we are pleased to offer you the position of flight attendant!

This I can tell you after hearing it not once but now four times from a company or HR rep of the company makes you literally jump for joy and wear a smile bigger than a Cheshew cat! Yes you’ve made it and you are off to Airline flight attendant training via an aviation medical. That is you have the job subject to an aviation medical. Check out this Flight Attendant Employment page if you need to be reminded just how good this job is.



If the whole of this seems daunting then many apologies but it probably is.
If you’d like the full story of what happens and why and all the types of questions and assessment of questions that goes on at a flight attendant interview plus...

a comprehensive package of bonus information manuals including a great one on ‘Group Interviews and How To Avoid The Interview Cull Process’, then take a look at the: AFAA 3-step system for flight attendant applicants.


To the top of flight attendant interview.